If you love sweaters with set-in sleeves, but hate to put sweaters together, this e-book is for you! Fused
             Construction Technique allows you to convert any sweater pattern written for knitting in separate pieces 
             into a seamless one. You will work your sweater bottom up, with no seams and you won't have to 
             pick up stitches around armhole. Knit your sweater up to armholes; knit the sleeves up to armholes; and 
             then fuse the sleeves and the body of the sweater together. You won't have to work on a sleeve cuff while 
             you have the whole sweater attached. After you do three-needle bind off to join the front and the 
             back shoulders, all you need to do is to work on your neck treatment and weave in ends.

            The book has a detailed instructions how to join the sleeves and the body of the sweater seamlessly 
             explained on a sample and detailed analysis of three patterns written in traditional way (bottom up, 
             in pieces) with explanations how to convert these patterns for seamless fused construction.

cache/wst.opf.4449050.xml
qsc/products/wst.qsc.5fe731f4-fb65-411d-be68-bbc72639cb2e.xml

Watch the trailer of the video:

Why the book and video?

Book gives descriptions of technique, but it’s difficult to master technique without demonstration.

Video provides demonstration, but lack descriptions, detailed explanation and graphics are difficult to follow on video.

We decided to pair two good things together under one cover.

We hope you’ll like what we do.

 
From the book:


Sleeve cap alterations.

I am not a big fan of the set in sleeve worked from the top down from the stitches picked up
around the armhole. The reason is very simple – if I discover that the sleeve cap doesn’t fit,
I have to undo it and knit the whole sleeve again. If I do the sleeve as a separate piece and it
doesn’t fit, I need to undo and alter only the top part. Much less work and I am a lazy one.
And I made an observation – the more one needs to undo and do over in a project, the more
likely the project is to end up in the UFO pile.

The rule of thumb for a hand knit set in sleeve is that the length of the sleeve cap should be
equal to the length of the armhole (front plus back). Yes, you have to measure. Take a tape
measure, or flexible ruler and measure your armhole and your sleeve cap. Make sure that the
length is the same. If the sleeve cap is a little longer than the length of the armhole, you can
ease the sleeve into the armhole. If the length of the sleeve cap is less than the length
of the armhole, you have to undo at least part of the sleeve cap and do it over again.

There are two ways to make the curve of the sleeve cap longer – either you have to make your
sleeve cap wider; or you have to make it longer. Which way to choose?

If your upper arms are big, it’s better to keep the height of your sleeve cap and make it
wider. That means you do fewer decreases in the lower, underarm slanting part of the
sleeve cap and more decreases near the top of the sleeve cap.

If your upper arms are slim, you should make your sleeve cap more narrow and make it
a little taller. It means you need to knit more rows on the even, vertical part of the sleeve.

And, don’t forget— keep your selvage stitches on a loose side. Tight selvage stitches
may result in a shortened sleeve cap curve.

There are two ways to make the curve of the sleeve cap longer – either you have to make your
sleeve cap wider; or you have to make it longer. Which way to choose?

If your upper arms are big, it’s better to keep the height of your sleeve cap and make it
wider. That means you do fewer decreases in the lower, underarm slanting part of the
sleeve cap and more decreases near the top of the sleeve cap.

If your upper arms are slim, you should make your sleeve cap more narrow and make it
a little taller. It means you need to knit more rows on the even, vertical part of the sleeve.

And, don’t forget— keep your selvage stitches on a loose side. Tight selvage stitches
may result in a shortened sleeve cap curve.

 
 
 
 
 
cache/wst.opf.3760097.xml
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
qsc/products/wst.qsc.9108bf39-fdb7-49e7-8a5b-772402b9f050.xml
Website Builder